The New American

The New American

In her debut novel, Three Apples Fell from Heaven, Marcom explored the traumatic aftermath of the Armenian genocide through the imagined thoughts and feelings of those left behind. Here, she pens a poetic reflection on deportation, immigration, and the abstract notion of home. The story follows Emilio, a young Guatemalan American college student who is deported and must make his way back to his family in California. Written in the third person, the narrative unfolds through Emilio’s inner thoughts as he moves with bands of immigrants across the landscape of Mexico. Enduring the endless brutality of the terrain, as well as a recurring cycle of violence at multiple stops along the journey, Emilio finds solidarity with his fellow travelers and begins to dissociate from his long-understood identity as an American. Interwoven into each section of the narrative are his memories of the past and his dreams for the future, which slowly evolve into the singular present. Marcom has penned a lyrical mediation on being and becoming, identity and anonymity, and the ambiguity of place.

A Shout in the Ruins

Powers’s debut novel, The Yellow Birds, a National Book Award finalist, offered a downloadpoignant rumination on America’s reverence for patriotism but simultaneous amnesia regarding the lives of deployed soldiers in a story drawn from the author’s own experience as an Iraq War veteran. This second novel, set in Powers’s hometown of Richmond, VA, probes the grip of traumatic memory in the aftermath of the Civil War. While former Confederate soldiers roam the backdrop of this work with conflicting convictions dictating their actions in a newly liberated South, former slaves are navigating the concept of freedom within the lingering structures of oppression. Meanwhile, a former plantation owner tries to harness Reconstruction to his advantage only to discover that redemption will not be his fate. Returning to this land, almost 100 years later, a man born shortly after the end of the war struggles to claim his memories of home. VERDICT A masterly meditation on our unbreakable connection to a world predicated on cyclical violence.

A Terrible Country

In his debut novel, All the Sad Young Literary Men, Gessen penned a passing nod to F. Scott Fitzgerald with an autobiographical tale of three writers struggling to turn their 9780735221314.jpgliterary ambitions into a lasting legacy. Similar themes from Gessen’s life emerge here, as the author ruminates on the complexities of his homeland from the perspective of floundering academic and Russian expat Andrei Kaplan. With few job prospects and the high cost of living in New York City, Andrei returns to Moscow, his birthplace, to care for his grandmother, improve his hockey skills, and decide whether the academic life is worth the trouble. Navigating Russian culture as he moves between his grandmother’s recollections of the USSR and his newfound revolutionary friends, he is caught between the ideologies of Putin’s Russia and the Western liberalism that underpinned both his upbringing and his education. When the possibility of a romantic relationship presents itself, Andrei discovers his own narrative paralleling that of Mother Russia: cling to a past that is gone or strive for a future that may never materialize? VERDICT With wit and humor, Gessen delivers a heartwarming novel about the multitudinous winding roads that lead us home.

The Overstory

Standing as silent witnesses to our interweaving genealogies, cyclical wars, and collapsing empires, trees contain our collective history in addition to our climate record. Here, the acclaimed Powers (Orfeo; The Time of Our Singing) employs literary dendrochronology to weave the stories of nine strangers connected through their 61WowQ0d7YL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgcollective action in preventing a forest from falling to industrial harvesting and ruination. From a chestnut in Iowa to a banyan in Vietnam, trees function as a central theme for each character’s backstory. As a corollary, foliage becomes a multivalent symbol of family struggle, divine intervention, and community. Just as Douglas firs connect their underground root structures to provide mutual support and protection, each character moves across disparate landscapes to find him- or herself joined in solidarity against an unstoppable force of environmental destruction. VERDICT Whereas Powers dissected the human brain’s mysterious capacity to prescind subject from object in his National Book Award—winning The Echo Makers, here he pens a deep meditation on the irreparable psychic damage that manifests in our unmitigated separation from nature.

Anatomy of a Miracle

Satire at its best is constructive social criticism, and Miles (Dear American Airlines; Want Not) is perfecting this craft in the 21st century. Outside a convenience store in Biloxi, MS, +-+0090328656_140Cameron Harris waits in his wheelchair while his sister runs in to buy beer. Cameron is an alcoholic. Cameron is a paraplegic. Cameron is a veteran of the war in Afghanistan. And, on this day, as he stands up and begins to walk, Cameron becomes a miracle. His hermetic life is soon turned upside down with floods of prayer requests and a reality television crew following him around. While Cameron’s doctor searches for a scientific explanation for his recovery in the medical literature, the Vatican dispatches an officer from the Congregation for the Causes of the Saints to open an investigation. As the world focuses on the mystery of his recovery, Cameron struggles to conceal a long-held secret that complicates our understanding of divine agency. VERDICT With sincerity and wit, Miles pens a strong, sardonic rumination on the religious boundaries of the miraculous.

American Histories

Throughout his decorated literary career, Wideman (Sent for You Yesterday; Philadelphia Fire) has compiled an extended meditation on how we are able to heal by transmuting personal and historical facts into constant reimagining. This sprawling collection of short +-+864814434_140stories is an unapologetic resurrection of those facts in today’s political climate, with Wideman’s introduction addressed directly to the president of the United States. The author returns to the streets of Pittsburgh and his childhood memories, envisions a conversation between John Brown and Frederick Douglass, and probes the popular culture we use to escape, forget, and grieve. Each story is a parallel universe just out of reach, with the whole assembled like shards of broken glass. Interspersing pieces that include microfictions like “Bunny and Glide” and prose poems like “Snow,” Wideman elucidates loneliness and helplessness with lyrical economy and rhythmic sadness. VERDICT A deeply personal collection of stories illuminating the thinning and cyclical threads of history that both sustain us and tear us apart.

All the Pieces Matter: The Inside Story of The Wire

With the premiere of The Deuce on HBO, interest in the work of David Simon has been 51+RD8FOqBL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_reignited, and The Wire is his magnum opus. Journalist and author Abrams (Boys Among Men) delves deep into the show’s creation and enduring legacy through interviews with the actors, writers, and producers who brought the show to life. Whether it’s Dominic West reflecting on the allure of his character Detective James McNulty or actor Michael B. Jordan discussing the lasting impression of being in an ensemble cast of primarily black actors, Abrams underscores the indelible mark the show has left on actors and audience alike. Weaving all the interviews together is the enduring connection between the city of Baltimore and the creators of the show, a city that David Simon and the writers of The Deuce recently visited for inspiration. VERDICT Building upon Rafael Alvarez’s The Wire: Truth Be Told, the author further underscores the reasons why the show is often referred to as the greatest of all time.

A Long Way From Home

Carey-Swoosh-thumbOne of Australia’s greatest authors, two-time Booker Prize winner Carey (Oscar and Lucinda; True History of the Kelly Gang) has drawn inspiration from his native country throughout his career, weaving historical and fantastical tales ranging from the 1942 Battle of Brisbane to transporting a glass church from Sydney to Bellingen. Here, he uses the famous Redex Trial, a cross-country car race, to probe the unfurling legacy of colonialism in 1950s Australia. Desperate to acquire his own dealership, Titch Bobs sees both fame and financial windfall in winning the Redex Trial. With wife Irene as his copilot and neighbor Willie as navigator, he sets off across Australia’s unfinished roads and rural landscape. While Titch remains intensely focused on winning the race, Irene and Willie uncover painful personal histories along the way that intertwine with Australia’s forgotten people and communities. VERDICT Carey employs both a multivoice narrative and a continent-spanning car race to emulate the disparate voices and fits and starts that comprise Australia’s history.

The Afterlives

In his first story collection, Hall of Small Animals, Pierce penned a phenomenological 510dPPHKbeL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_meditation on the ephemeral and recurrent experiences that form the core of human existence. Here, in his debut novel, he reflects on life after death through the prism of quantum physics. A paranormal event on a staircase in town leads Jim Byrd on a journey to uncover the history of the home’s residents and the probability of supernatural phenomena. In this quest, he dabbles in New Age religion, falls in love, loses his father, and stumbles upon the ideas of discredited physicist Sally Zinker, who claims to have built a machine that can access the afterlife. Jim, along with his wife, Annie, eventually tracks down both Sally and the mythic Reunion Machine. Not sure who or what to trust, they both must ultimately weigh the possibility of a multiverse against the risk of vanquishing their accumulated experiences and memories in this one. VERDICT Pierce has a gift for probing the limits of the psychic realm to uncover the benevolence that manifests from metaphysical insight. Truly remarkable.

Phone

Few John Updike fans would enjoy Self’s splintered, swirling narratives. Yet drug-addled coverpsychiatrist Zach Busner, a recurring character in Self’s fiction, is startlingly similar to Updike’s Rabbit Angstrom in his inability to process new forms of eroticism and spirituality as the stability of a world founded in modernist principles crumbles around him. Here, in the final book of the trilogy begun with Umbrella and Shark, Self probes the absurdity of the information age through two seemingly disparate narratives: the trials and tribulations of a wayward spy engaged in an affair with a tank commander, and the struggle of Zach’s family to provide for him as he ages. Set against the backdrop of the Second Gulf War, Self’s story lines are folded into a meditation on the meaning of a “double life” in a technology-soaked era. Bewildered by a world of spiritual decay and hyperconnectedness, Zach (like Rabbit) ultimately runs from himself. VERDICT The narrative reads and feels like an endless data stream, underscoring Self’s deliberate attempt to bury the reader in an avalanche of information. A sardonic end to Self’s modernist trilogy.

Green

As a member of Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign staff, Graham- Felsen helped articulate Obama’s message of empathy and cooperative change across social media outlets. Here, in his debut novel, he weaves those themes into a story about two 9780399591143friends navigating adolescence across the racial divide. Nicknamed Green, Dave is one of the few white kids attending Martin Luther King Middle School in Boston. His life is occupied with a daily struggle to fit in, which extends from his clothing to his demeanor. Through a shared admiration for Larry Bird and the Celtics, a black classmate named Marlon becomes one of Dave’s only friends and allies. Together, they manage the awkwardness of middle school under constant pressure to succeed from parents, teachers, and the larger community. As Marlon and Dave form their own individual identities, however, their similarities slowly become eclipsed by their differences, from family backgrounds to life goals. VERDICT Based on Graham-Felsen’s childhood in Boston in the 1990s, this work poignantly captures the tumultuous feelings of adolescence against the historical backdrop of a racially segregated city and country.

Crimes of the Father

Perhaps best known for the Booker Prize-winning Schindler’s Ark, released here as Schindler’s List and later adapted into an Academy Award-winning film, Australian1479080012982 novelist Keneally’s literary career spans six prolific decades and more than 30 novels. This book harkens back to both a theme in his first novel, The Place at Whitton, and to his career path before becoming a writer: the Catholic priesthood. The novel opens with Father Frank Docherty in a cab, returning to his hometown of Sydney, Australia, to visit his elderly mother after being sent to Canada for his outspoken views. A terse and confrontational conversation with the cab driver uncovers a sexual abuse scandal centered on the church’s revered defender, Monsignor Leo Shannon. As Docherty identifies the victims and reveals the truth, he begins challenging a hierarchy and power structure that has sanctified and defined his own existence. VERDICT Through the mind of his aggrieved and conflicted protagonist, Keneally pens an unflinching meditation on the ways in which canonical scripture, sacred tradition, and human conscience often coalesce to distort basic moral truths.

Good Booty: Love and Sex, Black and White, Body and Soul in American Music

From Britney Spears’s manufactured sex appeal to Jim Morrison’s toxic masculinity, NPR music critic Powers (Piece by Piece; Weird Like Us: My Bohemian America) explores the intersection between America’s musical landscape and its overwrought cultural views of sex. She opens with a meditation on the interplay between body and sound crystallized 9780062463692_p0_v3_s192x300in New Orleans’ Congo Square in the 19th century. Here, confluences of African and European musical styles blended to create the roots of jazz and what would become rock and roll. As a corollary, popular music became an amalgam of racial tension, sexual expression, and gender expectations that continue to reverberate into the new millennia. From Miley Cyrus’s twerking to Beyoncé’s “Formation,” Powers articulates how artists have manipulated or experimented with each of these threads to forge their own musical identity and sound. VERDICT With precision and wit, and across multiple musical genres, Powers contextualizes the complicated interplay of gender, sex, and race inherent in popular music within and against the backdrop of America’s puritanical founding.

The Red-Haired Woman

Winner of the Nobel Prize in 2006 for his unflinching and exhaustive ruminations on Istanbul in such books as Snow and My Name Is Red, Pamuk’s tenth novel is once again kirmizisaclikadin_200pxset in his beloved Turkey. The story follows Chem, a boy who finds both an employer and a father figure in Master Mahmut, a local well digger. As they move across the countryside, excavating the hidden waterways underneath the Turkish landscape, they also trade stories and myths about civilization. Despite his age, Chem has a sexual awakening with the mysterious redhead of the title whose hair is cut short by an ethical choice that will haunt him into adulthood. After acquiring both wealth and a fascination with tales of patricide and filicide, Chem is drawn back to the land and wells of his youth. Reality and myth intertwine to create a twist that will send readers back to page one with hurried excitement. VERDICT As much a meditation on the inescapability of fate as a classic murder mystery, this novel will both appease fans of Pamuk’s bibliography and delight first-time readers.

Shake It Up: Great American Writing on Rock and Pop from Elvis to Jay Z

The Library of America series features a black-and-white photo of the author against a black background underscored by a patriotic ribbon and is as iconic as apple pie. It’s fitting that the cover of an anthology capturing the groundbreaking and rebellious 51aGahyKBAL._SX336_BO1,204,203,200_nature of rock and roll defies this convention. Inspired by Phillip Lopate’s introduction to American Movie Critics, Dettmar (English, Pomona Coll.; Gang of Four’s Entertainment!) and Lethem (A Gambler’s Anatomy; Chronic City) successfully canonize rock and pop writing as a distinctive branch of American letters. A survey more than a chronological history, this collection pulls from the multiplicity of genres embedded under the rock moniker: jazz, punk, rap, and even experimental music. As a corollary, the multitude of voices in this collection are varied and diverse—especially noteworthy in a genre historically dominated by white men. From Jessica Hopper’s deconstruction of gender politics in emo music to Kelefa Sanneh’s musings on the limitations of Jay-Z’s lyricism as poetic text, this compilation is a stark reminder that rock and pop music are often simultaneously a disdain for and reflection of the society, culture, and time period in which it is produced.

Lonesome Lies Before Us

51FceLUGWoL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Authenticity, failure, art, and identity would be a succinct, thematic description of Lee’s oeuvre (e.g., The Collective). Of course, it wouldn’t summarize the depth of his work. Here, Lee introduces us to Yadin Park, a failed musician who refused to let a major record label erode the purity of his work and sense of self. Leading a meager existence with his girlfriend Jeanette Matsuda, a housekeeper at a local hotel, Yadin yearns to record one more album before resigning himself to laying carpet for a living in the quiet town of Rosarita Bay, CA. However, a chance encounter with Mallory Wicks, his former bandmate and lost love, reignites his creative passion and simultaneously damages his relationship with Jeanette. As this love triangle unfolds, each character faces his or her own struggle to lead a life of quiet frustration and unrealized dreams. VERDICT With wit and humor, Lee pens a touching meditation on the obstacles, hindrances, and snags one encounters in the pursuit of being an artist. Readers for whom Dana Spiotta’s Stone Arabia resonated will enjoy Lee’s rumination on creative success.

Spoils

In an article for the New York Times, Van Reet, a veteran of the First Calvary Division in Baghdad and recipient of a James Michener Fellowship, criticized the publishing phenomenon of the “War on Terror Kill Memoir,” exemplified by American Sniper and coverNo Easy Day. Rather than complicate the intricacies of death and combat, argues Van Reet, these books directly satisfy the American public’s morbid curiosity with body counts. Here, in his debut novel, Van Reet does something different, re-creating 2003 Baghdad and illuminating the confusion, patriotism, and regret experienced on both side of the battle lines. The triadic story unfolds around Cassandra, an American soldier captured by members of the Mujahideen Army; Abu Al-Hool, one of Cassandra’s captors; and Sleed, an American soldier searching for Cassandra. Focusing on the internal lives of each character, the author illuminates their individual quests for liberation—physically, spiritually, and ethically—amid the chaos of war. The narrative crescendos toward a bang-up ending involving all three protagonists, with the resolution a distressing commentary on what is gained and lost in the pursuit of victory. VERDICT Van Reet has penned an absorbing novel with an unflinching rumination on war’s ultimate sacrifice, reminiscent of Roy Scranton’s War Porn.

Everybody Had an Ocean

The opening vignette detailing Beach Boy Dennis Wilson’s initial encounter with Charles Manson sets the tone for McKeen’s (journalism, Boston Univ.; Mile Marker Zero, Too Old 51EprBoOGVL._SX332_BO1,204,203,200_To Die Young) latest foray into narrative nonfiction. With equal appreciation for the pop music emanating from Southern California’s musicians in the 1960s, McKeen also illuminates the lascivious, drug-addicted, and criminal activity undertaken by its makers. Though the central narrative is focused on the development of the Beach Boys and their enigmatic front man, Brian Wilson, McKeen relates their tragic success to seemingly unrelated artists of the same generation: Tina Turner and Joni Mitchell. In the tradition of music journalism, McKeen’s language oscillates between historian and superfan depending on the artist. His love for the Beach Boys, for example, is noticeable in prose and tone. VERDICT There is no shortage of literature dedicated to the music of this decade in American history. However, McKeen manages to hint at some larger forces, both dark and bright, that constellated this particular group of artists underneath the palm trees of La-La Land.

My Darling Detective

In his 2013 memoir, I Hate To Leave This Beautiful Place, Norman ref51d0UScgVYL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_lected on his maturation through an ever-shifting array of residences, from Michigan to Canada. The one form of continuity in Norman’s life was the public library, providing the spark for his luminous literary career. His new novel pays homage to the endurance and intrigue of libraries, as it is set in and around the Halifax Free Library. After his mother, recently retired as head librarian, inexplicably defaces a photograph during an art auction, Jacob Rigolet is left with questions about her erratic behavior, the significance of the photograph, and the true identity of his own father. Literally born in the Halifax Free Library, Jacob begins to piece together his childhood memories among the stacks in an attempt to solve the puzzle. Along with his fiancée, Martha, the detective assigned to the case, he soon discovers that the answers to his questions are tied to a cold murder case back in 1945. VERDICT Norman punctuates literary noir’s “darkness within” with both poignancy and a penchant for humor. Librarians will appreciate the nod to library and information science.

Mikhail and Margarita

Not unlike her main character, Himes is both a physician and a writer. Her debut novel reflects these two worlds, underscoring the necessity of artistry and imagination within cover_9781609453756_942_600the clinical application of objective science. Set during the Soviet famine of 1933, the story unfolds around Mikhail Bulgakov, a playwright and eponymous protagonist of the novel. Although struggling professionally and creatively under the Soviet censors, Mikhail finds an inexplicable fan in Joseph Stalin. While currying favor with the Soviet political elite, he is also being shadowed by Ilya Ivanovich, an agent of the secret police, for his association with Margarita, the mistress of his recently imprisoned friend. As Ilya’s interrogations of Margarita slowly evolve into affection, both men find themselves fighting for love and freedom within an oppressive system of order and discipline. VERDICT Drawing inspiration from Bulgakov’s novel, The Master and Margarita, unpublished in his lifetime, Himes pens a whirlwind tale of romance and intrigue that approximates, if not exceeds, the talents of one of Russia’s most heralded authors.

The World to Come

With the release of his fifth story collection, Shepard (You Think That’s Bad; The Book of Aron) continues to weave interlacing narrative threads that imaginatively evoke time and 51vEbW2H5CL._AC_UL320_SR222,320_place. Thematically, the ten stories in this collection illuminate both the comedy and the tragedy of humanity’s tethering to the vagaries of the universe. Whether it’s soldiers marooned on a radar station in the Atlantic Ocean or the racing mind of a parent moments before a tsunami destroys Crete in 365 CE, each of the tales in this collection re-creates the human circumstances around largely forgotten events. In the title story, the author beautifully narrates a tragic love story through a series of diary entries that presage the ungovernability of both the weather and the heart’s desires. Every page is a disturbing reminder that control is a mere illusion we employ to salve our consciences. VERDICT Shepard’s ability to rotate the masks of comedy and tragedy in a single story while poetically blending fact and fiction is on full display in this collection.

Nutshell

In the 17th century, René Descartes contended that merely doubting one’s own existence simultaneously proved that one existed: Cogito, ergo sum. In his newest and most provocative work to date, McEwan (Atonement; Amsterdam) stretches the philosopher’s dictum to its limits with a novel narrated from inside the womb. Trudy is the sur000c6273-572rogate of the unborn narrator, living in her estranged husband’s house while carrying on an affair with his brother, Claude. Endlessly rotating around, constantly awash in wine and food, and privy to the most hushed conversations between Trudy and Claude, the narrator learns of the star-crossed lovers’ plot to poison Trudy’s husband. Encased in amniotic fluid, the narrator is left to squirm in silence and await his arrival into the world, a world in which his mother murdered his father. This sensation of entrapment and helplessness mirrors Trudy’s conspiratorial relationship with Claude. As their plan quickly unravels, Trudy finds herself alone and ensnared in a web of lies. VERDICT McEwan joins Eric D. Goodman (Womb: A Novel in Utero) and Emma Donoghue (Room) in penning an expansive meditation on stability and identity from a confined perspective.

Angel of History

How does the mind grapple with transition, change, loneliness, and deterioration? Alameddine’s (An Unnecessary Woman; I, the Divine) body of work is an extended meditation on this central question. Though set in a psychiatric clinic waiting room, the 9780802125767.jpgnovel delves into the structural and temporal landscape of Jacob’s mind. The Yemen-born protagonist scavenges through the disparate memories of his transient life, from Beirut to San Francisco. His life is a constant struggle for acceptance and stability from a distant mother, an absent father, and a string of emotionally unavailable partners. Grieving the recent death of his boyfriend, Jacob is adrift in a blur of sadness, depression, and suicidal tendencies. Accompanying him on this retrospection are Satan, Death, and various saints, all vying to control the narrative of Jacob’s past, present, and future. This colorful cast of characters simultaneously challenges and encourages his mutinous path toward a final solution. VERDICT With humor and wit, Alameddine reconfigures the self in exile and all its implications

War Porn

The fragmented images of tortured prisoners from Abu Ghraib and the U.S. military’s Final Cover Image 052416tactic of “shock and awe” are what many remember from the 2003 invasion of Iraq. Scranton (Learning To Die in the Anthropocene; Fire and Forget) experienced these events firsthand during his 14-month deployment in Iraq with the U.S. Army. Here, in his debut novel, Scranton unflinchingly explores the political and moral stress of war inflicted on perpetrators, victims, and observers alike. Through the intertwining narratives of three characters—an American soldier serving in Baghdad, a math professor struggling to survive in occupied Iraq, and a vocal antiwar advocate at a barbecue in Utah—the author demonstrates how voyeurism functions as an anesthetic agent on both the spectator and the participant. Each character yearns to escape from and stop the brutality perceived in the world but finds the cyclical nature of violence inescapable. VERDICT Unlike most contemporary war literature, this work makes no attempt to excuse, venerate, or empathize with combat veterans. The result is an uncompromising look at the trauma of war that will leave readers shattered and disheartened, wondering whether the final gut punch illuminating the violence inherent in our culture was necessary or gratuitous.

The Sport of Kings

Underscoring the importance of place in fiction, Eudora Welty once wrote, “One place understood helps us understand all places better.” For Morgan (All the Livinbookcover.phpg), Kentucky is the place; she’s a longtime resident and an alumna of Berea College. Here, Henry Forge, the heir to a legacy estate in the state, dedicates both his fortune and life to the sport of kings. At Forge Run Farm, Henrietta, Henry’s daughter, tends to both her father’s aspirations for Hellsmouth, their award-winning filly thoroughbred, and her growing sexual predilections. However, when her attention turns toward Allmon, a black stable hand, Henrietta finds herself defying both her father’s racial prejudice and his dynastic aspirations. Though set in the 21st century, the narrative establishes each character’s backstory to reveal how the tendrils of the Bluegrass State’s racial history continue to color and coil around the present. Morgan also employs the pastoral vistas and calcium-rich bluegrass of Kentucky to tell a universal tale in a very specific setting. VERDICT A dense meditation on the ugliness that undergirds much of the sublime we as humans strive for and admire in life.

Zero K

In this new work, DeLillo (Underworld; Point Omega) ruminates on a concept from his 9781501135392_p0_v2_s192x300breakout 1985 novel, White Noise: “You have said goodbye to everyone but yourself. How does a person say goodbye to himself?” At the request of his father, Ross, Jeffrey Lockhart is flown to an obscure compound where his stepmother, Artis, Ross’s second wife, has chosen to die. Upon arrival, he learns that Artis will be cryogenically frozen, and that Ross intends to do the same. Wandering the caverns of the compound known as Convergence, replete with looping images on screens and monks shrouded in secrecy, Jeffrey stumbles upon the true ethos of the group. Faced with the prospect of losing both Artis and Ross to a theosophical cult, he struggles to argue against his father’s longing for immortality while justifying the importance of transience. VERDICT DeLillo’s rich language and rhythmic prose draw readers deep into a rumination on both the inescapability and alluring possibilities of the eternal return as the protagonists push against the physical and philosophical walls of Convergence.

Book of Numbers

51CGiGG5sLL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Language is paramount in Cohen’s work. His last novel, Witz, was a linguistically dexterous work spanning more than 800 pages. Two-page sentences spiked with shards of scattered verses invited the reader into the deep psyche of his characters. Here, the author pens a syntactically enticing narrative of technology. The main character, Joshua Cohen, is an unsuccessful novelist who makes a living as a ghostwriter. He has written everything from PhD dissertations to conference presentations for academics. However, when he is contacted by the CEO of Tetration, one of the world’s most successful tech firms, to ghostwrite his memoir, Cohen’s life transforms from the mundane to the electrifying. What starts as just another freelance job ends in an investigation of the technologies that mediate our collective fears and desires. Delving deep into the semantic web of our networked lives, Cohen pushes the reader into the wasteland of our abbreviated vocabulary, one SQL (structured query language) at a time. VERDICT Much like Cohen’s previous work, this densely packed narrative will appeal to readers with an appreciation for experimental fiction and the ever-expanding limits of language.

Andrew’s Brain

In Doctorow’s The March, readers are led into the mind of Union army general William Tecumseh Sherman as his troops burn their way through the Carolinas, leaving a wake of physical and psychological destruction. Here, the story master delivers the confined ANDREW'S BRAIN_FINALthoughts of Andrew, a troubled cognitive scientist, whose conversation with an unknown questioner details the dissolution of his own relationships, career, and connection with his child. Andrew’s frantic language paints an increasingly fragmented worldview marred by disorientation. Though sardonic, he also injects a heavy dose of levity into his retellings, speaking to an optimistic humanism in the face of despair. Periodically challenged by the questioner, Andrew is forced to confront his tendency toward a revisionist history and critically focus on the emotional impact of his actions. VERDICT Through this dialectic narrative, Doctorow connects to the common theme seen throughout his work: one’s history is often a battle between memory and self-struggle to maintain an image of morality and adequacy. Doctorow deftly captures the complex but beautiful vagaries of life in clean, simple language.

The Grand Tour: The Life and Music of George Jones

GrandTourCoverConsidered one of the greatest country songs of all time, “He Stopped Loving Her Today” would become George Jones’s (1931–2013) signature song and come to encapsulate his persona: a deeply tragic figure with a love and exuberance for life. Kienzle (Southwest Shuffle: Pioneers of Honky-Tonk, Western Swing, and Country Jazz) tells the story of this poverty-stricken, East Texas-raised crooner, whose rise to the top of the country music charts was followed by an equally precipitous descent into drugs, alcohol, and depression. Written chronologically, the biography follows Jones from his upbringing in Beaumont through his tumultuous marriage with singer Tammy Wynette and to the final decade of his life. As a biographer, Kienzle underscores the intersections between Jones’s professional and personal life, within the context of his abusive childhood. Through this lens, Jones’s discography of joyful and melancholy songs often reflected, obscured, criticized, and contradicted the personal experience of its singer. VERDICT Juxtaposed with Jones’s 1996 autobiography, I Lived To Tell It All, and last year’s account by his longtime songwriting collaborators Charlene & Peanutt Montgomery, The Legend of George Jones: His Life and Death, this latest addition is perhaps the most honest portrayal of one of music’s most controversial figures.

Black Deutschland

imagesIn his debut novel, High Cotton, Pinckney created a narrator who resists the reductive racial identity thrust upon him by society and embarks on a journey to define his individualism against and within the historical truth of his family, race, and upbringing. Similar themes run through this novel, as we follow Jed Goodfinch, a recently sober, young, gay black man in search of intellectual and psychological redemption in the fading days of West Germany. Escaping his native Chicago to live with his second cousin, Cello, Jed accepts employment with a renowned architect with an eye toward rebuilding Berlin in prewar stylings. In an attempt to restructure both the city and his own fragmented identity, Jed enters liminal stages of transition from addiction to sobriety and American to expat as Germany undergoes reunification. Meanwhile, his complicated but stable family structure crumbles, forcing Jed to close the physical and emotional distance between his new life in Berlin and his childhood roots in Chicago. In a narrative that intersperses humor with literary parables, Pinckney successfully prods at the protected and tightly bounded yet fraught arena of self-actualization and identity.

American Reference Book Annual

Whitty, Stephen. The Alfred Hitchcock Encyclopedia, New York, Rowan & Littlefield Publishers, 2016. ISBN 13: 978-1442251595

Erickson, Hal. Television Cartoon Shows: An Illustrated Encyclopedia, 1949 through 2003, 2nd ed. Jefferson, N.C. McFarland, 2016. 2v. ISBN 13: 978-1-4766-6599-3.

Jesus in History, Legend, Scripture, and Tradition: A World Encyclopedia. Houlden, Leslie and Antone Minard (ed.). New York., ABC-CLIO, 2015. 670p. $189 ISBN 13: 978-1-61069-803-0

Mormons and Popular Culture: The Global Influence of an American Phenomenon. Hunter, Michael J. New York., Praeger, 2012. 577p. $124 ISBN 13: 978-0313391675

The Columbia Sourcebook of Mormons in the United States. Givens, Terryl L. and Reid L. Neilsen. New York., Columbia University Press, 2014. 480p. $80 ISBN 13: 978-0-231-14942-6.

Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon. Cassin, Barbara. N.J., Princeton University Press, 2014. 1297p. $65 ISBN 13: 978-0-691-1370-1.

Undead in the West II: They Just Keep Coming. Miller, Cynthia and A Bowdoin Van Riper. Md., Scarecrow, 2013. 386p. $71 ISBN 13: 978-0810892644

Historical Dictionary of British Cinema. Burton, Alan and Steve Chibnall. Md., Scarecrow, 2013. 584p. $199. ISBN 13: 978-0810867949

St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture. New York., St. James Press. 2013. 3800p. $976. ISBN 13: 9781558628472.

Voices of Unbelief: Documents from Atheists to Agnostics. McGowan, Dale. Santa Barbara, CA. Greenwood, 2012. 234p. $100. ISBN 13: 978-1598849783

Historical Dictionary of Film Noir. Spicer, Andrew. Lanham, Md., Scarecrow, 2010. 473p. (Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts, no.38). $130.00. ISBN 13: 978-0-8108-5960-9.

Obituaries in the Performing Arts, 2009 Lentz, Harris M., III. Jefferson, N.C., McFarland, 2010. 585p. illus. $49.95pa. ISBN 13: 978-0-7864-4174-7.

Magill’s Cinema Annual 2010: A Survey of the films of 2009 Farmington Hills, Mich., Gale/Cengage Learning, 2010. 600p. index. $189.00. ISBN 13: 978-1-4144-4140-5.

Women Icons of Popular Music: The Rebels, Rockers, and Renegades Havranek, Carrie. Santa Barbara, Calif., Greenwood Press/ABC-CLIO, 2009. 2v. illus. index. (Greenwood Icons). $175.00/set. ISBN 0-313-34083-8. ISBN 13: 978-0-313-34083-3.

Dictionary of Philosophical Logic Cook, Roy T. Irvington, N.Y., Columbia University Press, 2009. 322p. $100.00. ISBN 13: 978-0-7486-2559-8.

Historical Dictionary of Bertrand Russell’s Philosophy Carey, Rosalind, and John Ongley. Lanham, Md., Scarecrow, 2009. 287p. (Historical Dictionaries of Religions, Philosophies, and Movements, no.93). $85.00. ISBN 13: 978-0-8108-5363-8.

Chart Toppers: The Great Performers of Popular Music over the Last 50 Years Brunning, Bob, and James Pickering. New York, Firefly Books, 2009. illus. index. $29.95. ISBN 13: 978-1-55407-496-9.

Ridley Scott Encyclopedia Raw, Laurence. Lanham, Md., Scarecrow, 2009. 337p. index. $85.00. ISBN 13: 978-0-8108-6951-6.

Abraham Lincoln on Screen: Fictional and Documentary Portrayals on Film and Television Reinhart, Mark S. Jefferson, N.C., McFarland, 2009. 241p. illus. index. $55.00. ISBN 13: 978-0-7864-3536-4.

A to Z of Philosophy Moseley, Alexander. New York, Continuum Publishing, 2008. 261p. $75.00; $16.95pa. ISBN 13: 978-0-8264-9947-9; 978-0-8264-9948-6pa.

Magill’s Cinema Annual 2008: A Survey of the films of 2007 Hilary White, ed. Farmington Hills, Mich., Gale, 2008. 604p. index. $165.00. ISBN 13: 978-1-558-62611-9.

Rock Band Name Origins: The Stories of 240 Groups and Performers Metzer, Greg. Jefferson, N.C., McFarland, 2008. 242p. index. $45.00pa. ISBN 13: 978-0-7864-3818-1.

Historical Dictionary of Hume’s Philosophy Merrill, Kenneth R. Lanham, Md., Scarecrow, 2008. 351p. (Historical Dictionaries of Religions, Philosophies, and Movements, no.86). $85.00. ISBN 0-8108-5361-2. ISBN 13: 978-0-8108-5361-4.

Academic Library Research: Perspectives and Current Trends Marie L. Radford and Pamela Snelson, eds. Chicago, American Library Association, 2008. 315p. index. $56.00pa. ISBN 13: 978-0-8389-0983-6.

Library Journal

Finnell, J. Hoffert, B., Bissell, S. Best Literary Fiction of 2018. Library Journal. Online.

Finnell, Joshua. “4321.” Library Journal 142.1 (2017): 83-84. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text, EBSCOhost (accessed July 28, 2017).

Finnell, Joshua. “Beast.” Library Journal 142.11 (2017): 77. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text, EBSCOhost (accessed July 28, 2017).

Finnell, Joshua. “Being Elvis: A Lonely Life.” Library Journal 141.18 (2016): 81. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text, EBSCOhost (accessed July 28, 2017).

Finnell, Joshua. “Everybody Had an Ocean: Music and Mayhem in 1960s Los Angeles.” Library Journal 142.6 (2017): 87-88. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text, EBSCOhost (accessed July 28, 2017).

Finnell, Joshua. “Good Booty: Love and Sex, Black and White, Body and Soul in American Music.” Library Journal 142.11 (2017): 89. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text, EBSCOhost (accessed July 28, 2017).

Finnell, Joshua. “Huck Out West.” Library Journal 141.16 (2016): 69. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text, EBSCOhost (accessed July 28, 2017).

Finnell, Joshua. “Lonesome Lies Before Us.” Library Journal 142.8 (2017): 65-66. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text, EBSCOhost (accessed July 28, 2017).

Finnell, Joshua. “Los Angeles in the 1970s: Weird Scenes Inside the Goldmine.” Library Journal 141.18 (2016): 81. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text, EBSCOhost (accessed July 28, 2017).

Finnell, Joshua. “Mikhail and Margarita.” Library Journal 142.2 (2017): 70. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text, EBSCOhost (accessed July 28, 2017).

Finnell, Joshua. “My Darling Detective.” Library Journal 142.4 (2017): 78. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text, EBSCOhost (accessed July 28, 2017).

Finnell, Joshua. “Nutshell.” Library Journal 141.14 (2016): 100. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text, EBSCOhost (accessed July 28, 2017).

Finnell, Joshua. “Paint Your Wife.” Library Journal 141.2 (2016): 70-71. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text, EBSCOhost (accessed July 28, 2017).

Finnell, Joshua. “Shake It Up: Great American Writing on Rock and Pop from Elvis to Jay Z.” Library Journal 142.10 (2017): 113. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text, EBSCOhost (accessed July 28, 2017).

Finnell, Joshua. “Spoils.” Library Journal 142.7 (2017): 80. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text, EBSCOhost (accessed July 28, 2017).

Finnell, Joshua. “The Angel of History.” Library Journal 141.13 (2016): 77. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text, EBSCOhost (accessed July 28, 2017).

Finnell, Joshua. “The Grand Tour: The Life and Music of George Jones.” Library Journal 141.4 (2016): 100-101. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text, EBSCOhost (accessed July 28, 2017)

Finnell, Joshua. “Black Deutschland.” Library Journal 141.1 (2016): 98. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 24 Feb. 2016.

Finnell, Joshua. “Book Of Numbers.” Library Journal 140.9 (2015): 68-69. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 24 Feb. 2016.

Finnell, Joshua. “Hunters In The Dark.” Library Journal 140.20 (2015): 94-96. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 24 Feb. 2016.

Finnell, Joshua. “John Prine: In Spite Of Himself.” Library Journal 140.4 (2015): 91. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 24 Feb. 2016.

Finnell, Joshua. “Kanye West: God & Monster.” Library Journal 140.11 (2015): 84-91. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 24 Feb. 2016.

Finnell, Joshua. “Paint Your Wife.” Library Journal 141.2 (2016): 70-71. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 24 Feb. 2016.

Finnell, Joshua. “The American People: Search For My Heart.” Library Journal 140.6 (2015): 82-83. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 24 Feb. 2016.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Folly.” Library Journal 140.17 (2015): 83. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 24 Feb. 2016.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Master Of The Prado.” Library Journal 140.17 (2015): 82. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 24 Feb. 2016.

Finnell, Joshua. “Season Of The Witch: How The Occult Saved Rock And Roll.” Library Journal 139.16 (2014): 86. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 24 Oct. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “10:04.” Library Journal 139.15 (2014): 68. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 24 Oct. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Snow Queen.” Library Journal 139.5 (2014): 108. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 24 Oct. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “In The Wolf’s Mouth.” Library Journal 139.11 (2014): 85. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 24 Oct. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Narrow Road To The Deep North.” Library Journal 139.12 (2014): 73. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 24 Oct. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Betrayers.” Library Journal 139.13 (2014): 84. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 24 Oct. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Summer House With Swimming Pool.” Library Journal 139.8 (2014): 67. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 24 Oct. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Dog.” Library Journal 139.14 (2014): 97. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 24 Oct. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Ballad Of A Small Player.” Library Journal 139.4 (2014): 85. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 10 Mar. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Secrecy.” Library Journal 139.2 (2014): 69. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 10 Mar. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Wire And Philosophy: This America, Man.” Library Journal 138.17 (2013): 104. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Andrew’s Brain.” Library Journal 138.17 (2013): 83. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Barred For Life: How Black Flag’s Iconic Logo Became Punk Rock’s Secret Handshake.” Library Journal 138.13 (2013): 100. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Enon.” Library Journal 138.13 (2013): 85. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Tilted World.” Library Journal 138.13 (2013): 85. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Sparta.” Library Journal 138.10 (2013): 99. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “A Beautiful Truth.” Library Journal 138.10 (2013): 98. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “My Education.” Library Journal 138.8 (2013): 67. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Dinner.” Library Journal 138.1 (2013): 81-82. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Middle C.” Library Journal 138.3 (2013): 91. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Charlotte Street.” Library Journal 137.16 (2012): 74-75. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Nothing Gold Can Stay.” Library Journal 137.18 (2012): 65. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Cubop City Blues.” Library Journal 137.5 (2012): 104-105. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Will Oldham On Bonnie “Prince” Billy.” Library Journal 137.15 (2012): 74. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “A Mind Of Winter.” Library Journal 137.13 (2012): 87. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Me, Who Dove Into The Heart Of The World.” Library Journal 137.12 (2012): 72. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Evel Knievel Days.” Library Journal 137.10 (2012): 95. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “House Of Holes: A Book Of Raunch.” Library Journal 136.11 (2011): 71-72. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Truth Like The Sun.” Library Journal 137.7 (2012): 79. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Pop When The World Falls Apart: Music In The Shadow Of Doubt.” Library Journal 137.3 (2012): 108. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “What We Think About When We Talk About Anne Frank: Stories.” Library Journal 137.3 (2012): 99. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Canada.” Library Journal 137.1 (2012): 93. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “American Dervish.” Library Journal 136.20 (2011): 109. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Iron Man: My Journey Through Heaven And Hell With Black Sabbath.” Library Journal 136.19 (2011): 77. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Our Man In The Dark.” Library Journal 18 (2011): 72. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Under The Harrow.” Library Journal 135.19 (2010): 58-59. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Box: Tales From The Darkroom.” Library Journal 135.14 (2010): 99-100. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Flying Saucers Rock ‘N’ Roll: Conversations With Unjustly Obscure Rock ‘N’ Soul Eccentrics.” Library Journal 136.15 (2011): 76. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Great Leader.” Library Journal 136.13 (2011): 84. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “East Of The West: A Country In Stories.” Library Journal 136.9 (2011): 83. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Best Seat In The House: A Cock Sparrer Story.” Library Journal 136.8 (2011): 84. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Beginners.” Library Journal 136.6 (2011): 86. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Record Players: DJ Revolutionaries.” Library Journal 136.4 (2011): 76. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Hold On To Your Dreams: Arthur Russell And The Downtown Music Scene, 1973-1992.” Library Journal 134.17 (2009): 77-78. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Listener.” Library Journal 134.16 (2009): 72-73. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Evolution Of Bruno Littlemore.” Library Journal 136.1 (2011): 83. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “When The Killing’s Done.” Library Journal 136.1 (2011): 80. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “You Think That’s Bad: Stories.” Library Journal 135.20 (2010): 110. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “You Must Go And Win.” Library Journal 135.19 (2010): 71. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Anthology Of Rap.” Library Journal 135.17 (2010): 82. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Gryphon: New And Selected Stories.” Library Journal 135.17 (2010): 71. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Kids Of The Black Hole: Punk Rock In Postsuburban California.” Library Journal 135.16 (2010): 77. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Edible Stories.” Library Journal 135.15 (2010): 67. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “To Hell With Cronjé.” Library Journal 135.15 (2010): 66. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Philosophy Of The Coen Brothers.” Library Journal 133.20 (2008): 131-132. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Tony Visconti: Bowie, Bolan And The Brooklyn Boy; The Autobiography.” Library Journal 133.2 (2008): 72-73. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Compass Rose.” Library Journal 135.12 (2010): 69. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Turbulence.” Library Journal 135.7 (2010): 73. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Typhus.” Library Journal 135.6 (2010): 76. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Boy With The Cuckoo-Clock Heart.” Library Journal 135.4 (2010): 77. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “How To Wreck A Nice Beach: The Vocoder From Stalin To Frampton To Bambaataa.” Library Journal 135.3 (2010): 98. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Ilustrado.” Library Journal 135.3 (2010): 91. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Infinities.” Library Journal 135.1 (2010): 85. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Director’s Cut.” Library Journal 134.19 (2009): 61. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Chronic City.” Library Journal 134.13 (2009): 69. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Savage.” Library Journal 134.9 (2009): 62. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Proof Of The Honey.” Library Journal 134.7 (2009): 80. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “London’s Burning: True Adventures On The Front Lines Of Punk, 1976-1977.” Library Journal 134.6 (2009): 77. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Slanted And Enchanted: The Evolution Of Indie Culture.” Library Journal 134.6 (2009): 77. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Book Of Rhymes: The Poetics Of Hip Hop.” Library Journal 134.2 (2009): 72. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “God’s Hazard.” Library Journal 134.2 (2009): 66. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Digging For Dirt: The Life And Death Of ODB.” Library Journal 133.14 (2008): 128. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “The Adventures Of Grandmaster Flash: My Life, My Beats.” Library Journal 133.8 (2008): 68. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.

Finnell, Joshua. “Somebody Scream!: Rap Music’s Rise To Prominence In The Aftershock Of Black Power.” Library Journal 133.2 (2008): 72. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text. Web. 29 Jan. 2014.